SNaP Ontologies

Simple News and Press Ontologies

Authors
Jarred McGinnis
Paul Wilton
Paul Harman
John O'Donovan

Contact

For all questions, please contact ontology@pa.press.net

Abstract

The news ontology is comprised of several ontologies, which describe assets (text, images, video) and the events and entities (people, places, organisations, abstract concepts etc.) that appear in news content. The asset model is the representation of news content as digital assets created by a news provider (e.g. text, images, video and data such as csv files). The domain model is the representation of the 'real world' which is the subject of news. There are simple entities, which we have labelled with the amorphous term of 'stuff' and complex entities. Currently, the only complex entity the ontology is concerned with is events. The term stuff has been used to include abstract and intangible concepts (e.g. Feminism, Love, Hate Crime etc.) as well as tangible things (e.g. Lord Ashdown, Fiat Punto, Queens Park Rangers).
Assets (news content) are about things in the world (the domain model). The connection between assets and the entities that appear in them is made using tags. Assets are further holistically categorised using classification schemes (e.g. IPTC Media Topic Codes, Schema.org Vocabulary or Press Association Categorisations).
The Identifier ontology lets us map resource URIs with legacy identifiers that exist under some authority (these maybe non-uri based).

For each ontology documented, requesting the ontology with .rdf or .ttl at the end of the URL will return the RDF/XML or Turtle representation. Clicking on the overview diagram below will open a larger diagram showing how all the ontologies work together.

Overview picture of the Ontology


License

All ontologies are currently licensed under this Creative Commons license

Note: the published ontology is an early draft and the restrictive licensing is to protect against the ontology splintering before we’ve had a chance to refine it. Once the ontology has stabilised and in more general use, we will move to the more liberal licensing terms to encourage uptake and use.